miaalyse96:

😂😂😂😂
miaalyse96:

😂😂😂😂
miaalyse96:

😂😂😂😂

miaalyse96:

😂😂😂😂


Alright, so these freaking exist. Hayden and Jamie Bell acting like ten year olds at the airport. I guess they needed something to do to keep themselves entertained in between filming for Jumper, lmao.

Alright, so these freaking exist. Hayden and Jamie Bell acting like ten year olds at the airport. I guess they needed something to do to keep themselves entertained in between filming for Jumper, lmao.

Alright, so these freaking exist. Hayden and Jamie Bell acting like ten year olds at the airport. I guess they needed something to do to keep themselves entertained in between filming for Jumper, lmao.


Hayden being adorable for the Spring 2000 Issue of Star Wars Insider (just after it was announced he would play Anakin).

Hayden being adorable for the Spring 2000 Issue of Star Wars Insider (just after it was announced he would play Anakin).

Hayden being adorable for the Spring 2000 Issue of Star Wars Insider (just after it was announced he would play Anakin).

When you’re ready come and get it

(Quelle: dailydoseofselena)

lifeasahouselove:

I love it when he smokes. (I know it’s unhealthy, but so hot!)

a-binary-sunset:

Dagmar in Hollywood meets Hayden Christensen.

He’s enough to make us all go over to the dark side

Much acclaimed for his Golden Globe-nominated performance in Life as a House (Alliance Atlantis), which premiered at last fall’s Toronto International Film Festival, Canadian Hayden Christensen, 21, had already set Tinseltown tongues wagging when he scored one of the hottest roles of all time: the doomed yet destined Anakin Skywalker (he will, after all, fall for an older woman, Queen Amidala, and father the famed twins Luke and Leia, all before he morphs into one of film history’s greatest and perhaps most misunderstood villains, Darth Vader) in this month’s Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones (20th Century Fox). But, like many of the big screen’s coolest leading men—George Clooney, Tom Hanks and teen-throb Paul Walker immediately come to mind—his career first took off on the small screen in Higher Ground . The force may just be with him.

Dagmar Dunlevy: People are still talking about your great performance and offbeat look in Life as a House. Who developed it?

Hayden Christensen: I did it myself. It was that transformation of getting into character every morning that made me believe in myself as Sam. It took about 45 minutes to put on the eyeshadow, all the earrings, the chin stud and whatever else I was wearing that day. It was important for me to do it myself so I could feel like I was building that mask up for myself, both as Sam and as an actor playing Sam. But it was a little unsettling looking at myself and having that black hair and wearing all those earrings because it’s something I find extremely desire-less. I wasn’t sure if I was really happy with the fact that I couldn’t recognize myself or if I just made the biggest mistake of my life. [Chuckles]

DD: Although you can’t talk about the plot, George Lucas did say that the next Star Wars would be more of a love story. Since the Darth Vader character is ingrained in our minds, how did you get there?

HC: That was one of the more challenging aspects of doing the role because the character was predefined by everybody else. The movie is public domain and you have an audience that you have to make sure you’re keeping happy because, in most cases, they know more about the film than I do. What we know, however, is that Darth Vader was this inherently very dark, very evil warlord. So for me, getting to play him as a good person left more room for my own interpretation and creative touch. It was a privilege to get to work with [Lucas], someone who was directing me and who also thought of the characters and scripted the characters. If you’re keeping him happy, then you’re doing your job right! George is a very busy director in that he has so much to pay attention to. When he does give an actor direction, it’s very specific and extremely helpful, so I appreciated that.

DD: Darth Vader requires tapping into your dark side, which is something you say you haven’t experienced in your own life.

HC: That’s the joy of acting. Getting to do things that are foreign to you and that you might not have any connection to otherwise and getting to experience [a character’s] own triumphs and insecurities is like experiencing [something] that a friend might go through. I had this personal pride that I felt for Sam [from Life as a House]. I was very proud of his transformation, but I don’t really see [this dark side] inside myself.

DD: In Attack of the Clones, we see the pre-Darth Vader Anakin Skywalker falling in love with Natalie Portman’s Queen Amidala. In real life, have you fallen in love?

HC: I don’t know. I’m still very young, so who’s to say that what I’ve experienced is love or not? I don’t know. Love is something that, if you can find it, I think you should [hold it] very dearly to you. I found it in my family and in my friends and not quite in a steady relationship with a girl, so maybe that’s next. We’ll see.

DD: Do you have a special relationship with your parents?

HC: Yeah. I have a very close relationship with my parents. I had a good upbringing. I’m friends with them.

DD: What else can you say about your family? You have an older brother and two sisters. Has that helped you understand women better?

HC: Oh, boy! [Laughs] Well, my parents run their own communications business in Toronto. It’s multifaceted. My mom’s a writer and my dad’s a software developer. It’s lots of stuff to do with computers. I don’t quite understand it myself, to be honest. I have two sisters and a mother, obviously, so I grew up with a household of girls. Maybe I have a greater respect for women because of it.